Daily Prune Consumption Supports Bone Health in Men Over 50

Rate this article

average: 0 out of 5)

average: 0 out of 5)

Rate this article

PRINT Print
Daily Prune Consumption Supports Bone Health in Men Over 50
  • Research has already shown significant evidence that prunes have a positive effect on bone health in women — this study shows that prunes support bone health in men, too. 

  • In this study, men who were randomized to consume 100 grams of prunes (about 9-10 prunes) per day for 1 year had significant decreases in biomarkers of bone breakdown, while no changes were observed in the control group. 

  • The men who ate prunes also showed improvements in bone geometry, indicating greater bone strength. 

This article was posted on EurekAlert.org:

New research from San Diego State University’s School of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences reports that eating prunes daily has a protective effect on bone health in men over 50. This study is the first of its kind to examine the beneficial prune effect on bones in men. 

“We’ve already seen significant evidence that prunes have a positive effect on bone health in women, so it’s particularly exciting to find that prunes can also play a beneficial role in men’s bone health. We look forward to continuing to study the ‘prune effect’ on bone and other health outcomes in men,” said lead researcher Professor Shirin Hooshmand, PhD, RD, School of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, San Diego State University.

In this randomized-controlled clinical study, 57 healthy men aged 50-79 years old were assigned to either consume 100 grams of prunes every day or no prunes for twelve months. At the conclusion of 1-year, the prune consumers showed significant decreases in biomarkers of bone breakdown, while no changes were observed in the control group (Hooshmand et al., 2021). The study authors also reported the men who ate prunes showed improvements in bone geometry indicating greater bone strength.

Historically, research has focused on bone health in women, already indicating a favorable bone response to prunes specifically among postmenopausal women. Several studies have suggested that eating 50 to 100 grams of prunes everyday could lead to increased bone mass and decreased bone breakdown (Arjmandi et al., 2001; Hooshmand et al., 2011, 2014, 2016). Moreover, a recent case study published in the Bone Reports earlier this year reported that total bone mineral density increased in a postmenopausal woman with bone loss after she consumed 50 grams of prunes daily for 16 months (Strock et al., 2021).

“Bone health is not just a concern for women. Men need to think about how to protect their bones as well,” said Leslie Bonci, MPH, RDN and consultant with the California Prune Board. “Prunes are a shelf-stable and nutrient-packed food that provide a preventive, proactive, palatable option for men to optimize their bone health.”

While San Diego State University’s newest research is an exciting addition to existing prune-focused literature, more investigations into the effect of prunes on human bone health are currently underway. An upcoming study from Pennsylvania State University examines how consuming different amounts of prunes affects health outcomes in postmenopausal women over a one-year period.

The men’s bone study by Hooshmand et al. (2021) can be found here.

# # #

Rate this article

Rate this article

Share This Article


Share your Comments
Enrich and inform our Longevity Community. Your opinion matters!